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G2Voice Broadcast #81: NOT in the mouth, so NOT on the skin!

Tune in Sunday April 1st, 2018 at: 10 AM CST on:

www.g2voice.is

Spanish subtitling is being done each week now! Broadcasts 001-005, 064,065, 077-080 are now subtitled in Spanish!

 

 

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This week’s Testimonies!

 

Michelle Gugel 15 hours ago 

I have listened to Kari Rivera and all the same we are just sticking with your protocol Mark.its working great ! I'm going to write my first testimony for her tonight. I'm about ready to jump out of my skin! 10 years on epilepsy drugs and in less than a month on MMS, she's not taking seizure drugs anymore and no epileptic fits!! OMG

 

 

Hi Mark,

Besides my lungs clearing little by little, I recently had an interesting occurrence (3rd week of MMS) which I had not heard of in any of the numerous testimonials I had watched or read and am wondering if you ever heard of it. I believe it is related to MMS detox. For about 3 days I had what felt like fluttering muscle spasms in the region of the lower middle area of the liver. It was not painful at all only something very odd. It was not surface spasming, but something internal. It was a fluttering feeling for a few seconds that hit about every hour or two.

I am also hoping that my new found ability to breathe through my nose at night is not a fluke. It is so exciting to think I can say goodbye to this decades-long nightly irritation - fingers crossed.

Bill

Hi Jordan,

I started my friend who has Lyme's disease on the protocol starting the middle of Dec 2017 . He did not realize he had this until it progressed.  He probably contracted it about Sept 2016.He made it through up to 2 drops of the starting protocol,  then around the middle of Dec had to cut back to 1 drop (diarrhea and great fatigue). He has had some relief of symptoms  and at about a 6 on a scale of 1-10 (being the best) to date. He has held to this improvement to date. To me it was like a miracle to witness this much change. But if he tries to do to much around the house, it wipes him out for the night and the next day. he is (was) a normally extremely strong person and in good health)Went back up to 2 drops around the second wk of Jan. He some trouble with that dose again. Stuck with it until around Feb but could not go beyond 2 drops. He has tried a few time in March to increase to 3 drops but it always give him diarrhea. I suggested that he take ONE 3 drop dose/day and the rest keep at 2 drops. He just started that yesterday.

Hi Folks;  I have ordered 4 kits now for friends and family and I heard from one of them today and she said that the DMSO wouldn't come out of the bottle and when she opened it up, it had all crystalized.  She did not want to keep taking it and I told her I would try to reach you to see if she could get a replacement.  By the way I haven't felt this great in years since taking the sacraments.  I'm 66 year old and have gotten off all my meds (antidepressants and blood pressure)  I also have boundless energy and no longer have fibromyalgia symptoms.  Thank you so much for your work and I will continue to spread the word.

Thank you, Kristi

Good morning, Jordan ...

Thank you so much for your speedy reply.

Between my first and second round, I resumed my previous habits which included a glass of red wine in the evenings. That went on for three days and then on the fourth day, I began feeling really lousy with body aches, anxiety, ringing in the ears and lack of energy. Up to that point, I had no alcohol and no sweets. I have a pretty healthy diet otherwise although I could say that there's always room for improvement. I normally drink about half a gallon of water on any given day, so flushing is not an issue and I'm drinking purified water as well. 

To answer Mark's question ... yes, I had kidney issues before however, the pain I had was on the left kidney and it was not a condition I had been dealing with for a prolonged period of time. It started about a month or so before I began taking MMS .The pain I'm experiencing now is on the right. Today, it's not as acute. The other unsettling experience is the rushing, nervous sensation that courses through my entire system. It's like I've got a motor running throughout my system and it never shuts off.  With all of that I will say that I feel pretty good. I sleep well, my digestion is better than it has been in years, my joints feel more lubricated and I have regular and consistent bowel movements. 

Anyway, I'm feeling motivated and encouraged to keep with what I am doing. I suspect I'm just experiencing a die-off reaction. Perhaps my yeast overgrowth is much more advanced than I thought when I went onto the MMS and so it is going to take some time to release it all. 

Thank you so much for your support. I deeply appreciate your speedy reply to my concerns.

Michael 3 weeks ago

I'm expecting my 1st shipment of MMS from Florida. It's arriving tomorrow.... so says the tracking on USPS. I'm a 50yr old disabled veteran with many ailments. I had a Spinal Injury but still can walk mainly from refusing to be in a wheelchair, 3 failed Spine surgeries, Type 2 Diabetic since 2007, Left & Right Knee injuries with Peroneal nerve loss in left leg from knee down which is painful when walking or standing, Tinnitus, Sinus problems and stomach issues. I've been on meds for PTSD that would make me feel like I was at a Grateful Dead concert. Also Keratoconus in both eyes among other issues. I was on Dilaudid, Morphine etc. with kickers of Hydrocodone etc. for decades. I quit the pain killers cold turkey about 2 yrs ago as they weren't working and were just clouding my mind. I've been on so many Veterans Administration meds, hundreds of them for over 30 yrs that I cant list them all so I'm sure my body is littered full of chemicals that are basically killing me slowly. I fight hard everyday just to keep moving. I've read the stories & seen the vids on people saying MMS is dangerous but those VA meds have to be even more dangerous in my opinion. So I will find out soon whether MMS is the real deal. If it works maybe it can help some of my other veteran brothers. I'm willing to be the Guinea pig lol.


Genesis II Church 3 weeks ago

Michael, do the Starting Procedure and go slow. Lord bless,Mark


  • ·

Michael 3 weeks ago

I appreciate your reply, sir. I started with 1 drop doses and went up from there over the last 4 days. I just got up this AM and today will be the 5th day. I've reached 3 drops with no problems. I never got an upset stomach or anything. Pain levels have dropped off in certain parts of my body. I'm going to continue with the protocol 1000. I've noticed a few strange things...my sense of smell is way better and I have a cracked tooth that was painful and it's not hurting now. My wife is helping me keep a daily log of any changes.

  • ·Michael 1 hour ago

Well I haven't been able to stick 100% to the protocol but I feel better. It has definitely helped with pain. I notice if I don't take it for a few days and then take a dose I instantly feel better. I do have way more energy etc.

Tina Always a VIP! 7 months ago

Thanks Gentleman for all that you do! I'm sorry but, I'm not seeing the link for the autism complaint... I know plenty that would send the documents I just need the info. Wishing I could make it to Columbia for your next lecture... unfortunately my health won't allow me at this time anyway possible I'll be there for the next. Starting my MMS documentation about my personal​ healing from near death to I won't allow to be murdered. God bless!

The fact is; if you won’t put it in your mouth you shouldn’t put it on your skin. Does it really absorb that much of what is applied to it?

 

G2Voice Broadcast #81: NOT in the mouth, so NOT on the skin!

What you put on your body is just as significant as what you put in your body. Your skin is the largest organ of your body and since it is porous, it absorbs whatever you put on it.

A study published in the American Journal of Public Health looked into the skin’s absorption rates of chemicals found in drinking water. It showed that the skin absorbed an average of 64% of total contaminant dosage. Other studies found the face to be several times more permeable than broad body surfaces and an absorption rate of 100% for underarms and genitalia. And another peer-reviewed study showed 100% absorption for fragrance ingredients.

It is easy to see that what we use on our skin ends up inside our bodies. So, it is important to pay close attention to the ingredients in our skin care products. If the products you use contain harmful ingredients such as harsh, toxic chemicals, colors, and fragrances, those ingredients make their way into your body, your blood and lymphatic system. The majority of mainstream body care products contain a cocktail of carcinogenic chemicals, allergens, and irritants.

To eliminate a lot of toxic chemicals, preservatives, and fragrances that are harmful to our bodies, choose certified organic and natural skin care products. It is important to read labels and become educated about what ingredients to avoid when selecting body care products. A good motto to go by is if you can’t pronounce it or have only seen it in chemistry class, don’t use it! Petroleum derivatives, preservatives, synthetic fragrances and dyes go by many names. A few examples of common ingredients to steer clear of are Cocoamidopropyl Betaine, Olefin SulfonatGe, Sodium Luaroyl Sarcosinate, Potassium Cocoyl Glutamate, Sulfates, Parabens, and Phenoxyethanol. Following is an example of a mainstream product and the synthetic ingredients it contains:

Vaseline Intensive Care Dry Skin Lotion

Ingredients from packaging: ACTIVE INGREDIENT: ETHYLHEXYL P-METHOXYCINNAMATE (SPF 5). OTHER INGREDIENTS: WATER, GLYCERIN, STEARIC ACID, GLYCOL STEARATE, SUNFLOWER SEED OIL, SOYA STEROL, LECITHIN, TOCOPHERYL ACETATE, RETINYL PALMITATE, DIMETHICONE, GLYCERYL STEARATE, CETYL ALCOHOL, TEA, MAGNESIUM ALUMINUM SILICATE, FRAGRANCE, CARBOMER, STEARAMIDE AMP, CORN OIL, METHYLPARABEN, DMDM HYDANTOIN, IODOPROPYNYL BUTYLCARBAMATE, DISODIUM EDTA, PG, BHT, TITANIUM DIOXIDE, YELLOW NO. 10.

By selecting organic and natural products for yourself and your family, you are taking a big step toward a healthier lifestyle. The developing organs of babies and children are particularly sensitive to chemicals, so it is especially important to use safe products for your youngsters. Down to Earth has a wide selection of natural and organic body care products. Look for even more in the near future as our team is working hard to ensure that DTE carries the purest products available.

Source: https://www.downtoearth.org/health/general-health/your-skin-it-absorbs

 

 

Occupations at Risk for harmful exposures to the skin

 

Workers at risk of potentially harmful exposures of the skin include, but are not limited to, those working in the following industries and sectors:

  • Food service
  • Cosmetology
  • Health care
  • Agriculture
  • Cleaning
  • Painting
  • Mechanics
  • Printing/lithography
  • Construction

Dermal exposure to hazardous agents can result in a variety of occupational diseases and disorders, including occupational skin diseases (OSD) and systemic toxicity. Historically, efforts to control workplace exposures to hazardous agents have focused on inhalation rather than skin exposures. As a result, assessment strategies and methods are well developed for evaluating inhalation exposures in the workplace; standardized methods are currently lacking for measuring and assessing skin exposures.

OSD are the second most common type of occupational disease and can occur in several different forms including:

  • Irritant contact dermatitis,
  • Allergic contact dermatitis,
  • Skin cancers,
  • Skin infections,
  • Skin injuries, and
  • Other miscellaneous skin diseases.

Contact dermatitis is one of the most common types of occupational illness, with estimated annual costs exceeding $1 billion.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/skin/

There are far too many toxics in consumer products to cover here, so we've decided to focus on the groups of harmful ingredients on our "Never List", which reads: "No Artificial Fragrances or Colors, MEA, DEA or TEA, Parabens, Phthalates, PEG compounds, Sulfates, Silicones, or any other petrochemicals". Here we go:

Artificial Colors
Function: Colorants. 
Found in: Tinted/colored products. 
Danger: Dyes are often derived from coal tar or other petroleum byproducts. 
How they’re listed: Usually as a color followed by a number (ie, “Red 4”).

Artificial Fragrance
Function: Scent.
Found in: Scented products and perfumes.

Danger: The terms "Fragrance" (USA) and "Parfum"(EU) give no information about the ingredients in the scent, which may include many synthetic and potentially allergenic compounds (by law in the US, companies are not required to disclose the ingredients in their "fragrance" as it's considered a trade secret). If a product is in fact all-natural, "fragrance" or "parfum" should be followed by an asterisk on the ingredient list, with a footnote clarifying what the "fragrance" actually consists of (i.e, "composed of 100% pure essential oils.")
How they’re listed:
“Fragrance” or “Parfum” (without an asterisk).

MEA (Monoethanolamine), DEA (Diethanolamine), or TEA (Triethanolamine) derivatives
Function: Surfactants (foaming agents), emulsifiers (prevents separation of ingredients).
Found in: Face and body washes, shampoos, hair colors, and more.
Danger: Possible carcinogens, may result in contamination with nitrosamines. 
How they’re listed: Anything with MEA, DEA, or TEA.

Parabens
Function: Preservatives.
Found in: 75 to 90% of all cosmetic products on the market
Danger: Endocrine disruptors, possible carcinogens.
How they’re listed: Methyl/ethyl/butyl/isobutyl/propyl paraben.

PEG Compounds
Function: Humectants (attracts moisture), surfactants (foaming agents), emulsifiers (prevents separation of ingredients), penetration enhancers (increases product absorption into skin).
Found in: Lotions, soaps, shampoo, makeup, and more.
Danger: May be contaminated with carcinogens like 1,4-dioxane, can help carry these impurities through skin, may cause birth defects and infertility.
How they’re listed: Anything with “PEG” in the name.

Phthalates
Function: Plasticizers, fragrance solvents. 
Found in: Many perfumes and scented products.
Danger: Endocrine disrupters, respiratory toxicants, can cause birth defects and infertility in males, may lead to pregnancy loss in females, may alter childhood brain development.

How they’re listed: Commonly hidden under “fragrance” or “parfum”; Anything with “phthalate” in its name, or DBP, DEHP, DMP, DEP. 

Silicones 
Function: Emollients (seals in moisture), emulsifiers, texturizers. 
Found in: Lotions, soaps, shampoo, makeup, styling products and more.  
Danger: Though not associated with serious human health problems, silicones are environmental contaminants, non-biodegradable, and prohibited ingredients under the EcoCert certification. 

How they’re listed: Anything that ends in “cone,” “conol,” “col,” or “xane.”

Sulfates
Function: Surfactants (foaming agents), emulsifiers (prevents separation of ingredients).
Found in: Face wash, body wash, shampoos, soaps, toothpaste, and more.
Danger: Common irritants, penetration enhancers, may be contaminated with known carcinogens like 1,4 dioxane.
How they’re listed: Sodium lauryl/laureth sulfate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, sodium salt sulphuric acid, monododecyl ester.

We know it’s a lot to take in, and also a little scary! We don’t yet have perfect knowledge here, but we’re doing our best to find “the truth” – as much as that’s possible – and we’re committed to sharing our learning as we go.

Source:https://www.ursamajorvt.com/blogs/the-blog-cabin/17977869-what-are-toxics

Top 10 products/ingredients to avoid, scrutinize or reduce use:

  1. 1. Talc-based powder
  2. 2. Nail polish
  3. 3. Baby shampoo: Do your homework well when choosing baby shampoo (and all baby products)! A chemical called 1,4-dioxane is all too common in most brands. Product tests released by author and researcher David Steinman found 1,4- dioxane in more than 12 different best-selling brands of both shampoo and bubble bath. And 1,4-dioxane is cited as a probable carcinogen by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and as an animal carcinogen by the National Toxicology Program. Unfortunately, this is a clear-cut example of the hidden dangers that lurk in your products that are not listed on the label. Because 1,4-dioxane is produced during manufacturing, the FDA does not require for it to be listed as an ingredient on the labels of products.
  4. 4. Bubble baths
  5. 5. Hair dyes
  6. 6. Petroleum-based products
  7. 7. Fragrances
  8. 8. Deodorant
  9. 9. Skin primers made with silicone or other cone products
  10. 10. Baby wipes

Source: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/deborah-burnes/skin-care_b_1540929.html

Here is another product I remember using as a kid and even my wife used on our children. It is from Johnson and Johnson, a family company as the advertisement says. Johnson and Johnson was sued over baby’s talc powder! These are products for babies. I would like there to be a strong oversight on the safety of children, wouldn’t you? Well, you see what is ‘approved’ to be injected into children so NO surprise that the prostitutes in the FDA allow this. I say prostitutes because they do it for money. They are all paid off! Again, read the vaccine/medical time line in this book.

Johnson & Johnson ordered to pay $417m in lawsuit linking baby powder to cancer. This company wouldn’t pay that much money unless it was proven. The verdict marks the largest sum awarded in a series of talcum powder lawsuit verdicts against Johnson & Johnson in courts around the US - Aug 22, 2017 Associated Press, Los Angeles.

 

 


Putting It on Your Skin Does Let It in: What’s in Skin Care and How It Affects Your Health

By Deborah Burnes



You might have heard that sure, parabens and other chemicals in your skin care are bad if ingested, but they can’t penetrate your skin so you don’t have anything to worry about. The fact is, much of what we place on our skin is absorbed into our bloodstream. Just think about nicotine and birth control patches. We administer effective doses through the skin to our bloodstream, enabling us to forgo a daily oral pill in lieu of a patch that prevents pregnancy. Or a patch that keeps nicotine in our system without the side effects of smoking, allowing us to wean off of an addiction. While there may be some chemicals that are too large to enter our bloodstream, many are small enough to penetrate. In 2005, the Environmental Working Group published a combination of two studies that found toxic chemicals in the umbilical cord blood of newborn babies born in the U.S. in the fall of 2004. They screened for more than 400 chemicals, and an astounding 287 toxins were detected within the umbilical cord blood of these newborns. Of these 287 chemicals, 217 were neurotoxins, and 208 are known to damage growth development or cause birth defects. These toxins included mercury, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polybrominated and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and furans (PBCD/F and PBDD/F), perflorinated chemicals (PFCs), organochlorine pesticides like DDT and chlordane, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated napthalenes (PCNs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and many others. These study results have been largely ignored by the media.

Since we know without debate that some chemicals can and do enter your bloodstream through topical application,  you’re better off doing your best to avoid all known harmful chemicals on the chance they are entering your bloodstream.

The task of scrutinizing every ingredient in the bevy of daily products the average consumer uses can be daunting. Start with the products that are having the most negative impact. The next thing you want to think about is the level of exposure you’re getting from the products you’re using. Different products mean different levels of exposure and concern. For instance, if you use a lotion all over your body and it soaks into your skin all day, you’re getting a lot more exposure to those chemicals than if you were to use the same ingredients in a face cleanser that is quickly washed off. So be strategic — try to get the best ingredients in products that you have a lot of exposure to (shampoo, lotion, sunscreen, etc.), and if you want to, relax your standards a bit for products like hand soap.

When we try to be perfect, we get paralyzed. It can get so overwhelming to constantly worry about each ingredient in every product that we just want to forget the whole thing and buy a bar of soap already. The way to avoid this is by choosing when to demand a certain standard and when to relax. That way you don’t have to worry about every ingredient all the time and you can still drastically improve the overall quality of your beauty products.

Top products to look for cleanest ingredients:

  1. 1. Anything you soak in (ie bubble bath)
  2. 2. Anything you apply and do not wash off, such as lotion, face and body creams, and oils
  3. 3. Body powder
  4. 4. Shampoo and conditioner (which is a wash off, but has high exposure due to where you use it and the way it “washes” over your entire body)
  5. 5. Any product you put on your child

Products that have limited exposure (so you can relax your standards if you choose):

1. Eye shadow

2. Nail polish remover (unless you are changing colors daily)

3. Hand soap (excluding anti-bacterial)

4. Blush

5. Leave-in hair care products — while it may seem confusing to have leave-in hair care products in the limited exposure and shampoo and conditioner as high exposure, there is a difference in application and exposure (not chemical content). Leave-in products are applied out of the shower (so the product is not “washing” all over your body), and they are also not applied on the scalp (only on the hair itself where it is absorbed by your hair, not your skin). Additionally, when you rewash your hair a large percentage of the leave-in has been brushed or worn off, allowing for fewer chemicals to be “washed” over your body.

Top 10 products/ingredients to avoid, scrutinize or reduce use:

1. Talc-based powder

2. Nail polish

3. Baby shampoo: Do your homework well when choosing baby shampoo (and all baby products)! A chemical called 1,4-dioxane is all too common in most brands. Product tests released by author and researcher David Steinman found 1,4- dioxane in more than 12 different best-selling brands of both shampoo and bubble bath. And 1,4-dioxane is cited as a probable carcinogen by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and as an animal carcinogen by the National Toxicology Program. Unfortunately, this is a clear-cut example of the hidden dangers that lurk in your products that are not listed on the label. Because 1,4-dioxane is produced during manufacturing, the FDA does not require for it to be listed as an ingredient on the labels of products.

4. Bubble baths

5. Hair dyes

6. Petroleum-based products

7. Fragrances

8. Deodorant

9. Skin primers made with silicone or other cone products

10. Baby wipes

 

The Dirty Dozen: 12 Toxic Cosmetic Ingredients You Should Toss

TCM is on a mission to spread the word about clean beauty brands with safe products we can rely on. Have you ever wanted to detox your beauty routine, but didn’t know where to start? We get that – learning to read skincare and makeup labels is like learning a whole new language.

We love this Dirty Dozen list selected by MPWR Skincare that takes the popular organic foods idea and puts it to good use in our makeup bags and vanities. No need to make flashcards here. Just read, bookmark and take small steps toward a cleaner routine one shampoo, perfume and lipstick at a time…

Phthalates (Dibutyl Phthalate)

What is it? Phthalate (prounced thal-ate) is used mainly in nail products as a solvent for dyes and as a plasticizer that prevents nail polishes from becoming brittle. Phthalates are also unlisted fragrance ingredients in many other cosmetics. LEARN MORE HERE

Why is it harmful? It has been shown to cause developmental defects and is toxic to reproduction and can also harm the unborn and impair fertility. Phthalate exposure has been linked to early puberty in girls, and a risk factor for later-life breast cancer. Dibutyl phthalate is banned in cosmetics in the European Union.

Sulphates (Sodium Laurate, Lauryl Sulphate or SLS)

What is it? Primarily used as a foaming agent or detergent to be found in shampoos, facial cleansers, bubble bath products, household and utensil cleaning detergents.

Why is it harmful? Depending on the manufacturing process, Sodium laureth sulfate may be contaminated with ethylene oxide and 1,4-dioxane. Both contaminants may cause cancer. Also, ethylene oxide may harm the nervous system and interfere with human development, and 1,4-dioxane is persistent. In other words, it doesn’t easily degrade and can remain in the environment long after it is rinsed down the shower drain.

Parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, butyl-, isobutyl-)

What is it? Parabens are a group of compounds widely used as an antifungal agent, preservative and antimicrobial in creams, lotions, ointments and other cosmetics, including underarm deodorants. An estimated 75-90% of cosmetics contain this toxin. LEARN MORE HERE

Why is it harmful? Parabens are easily absorbed by our skin. Parabens can mimic estrogen and has been detected in human breast cancer tissues. It is estimated that women are exposed to 50mg of parabens per day. They are absorbed through the skin and have been identified in biopsy samples from breast tumors.

Formaldehyde

What is it? These are primarily preservatives commonly found in cosmetics. It is also found in baby bath soap, nail polish, eyelash adhesive and hair dyes.Look for: DMDM hydantoin, diazolidinyl urea, imidazolidinyl urea, methenamine, quaternium-15, and sodium hydroxymethylglycinate. These ingredients slowly and continuously release small amounts of formaldehyde. LEARN MORE HERE

Why is it harmful? Formaldehyde has a long list of adverse health effects, including immune-system toxicity, respiratory irritation and cancer in humans. Formaldehyde is a recognized human carcinogen.

BHA and BHT (butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene)

What is it? BHA and BHT are synthetic antioxidants used as preservatives in lipsticks and moisturizers and are also used as food preservatives. LEARN MORE HERE

Why is it harmful? They can cause allergic reactions, liver, thyroid and kidney problems along with lung function impairment and problems in blood coagulation. Moreover, they mimic estrogen and can have an adverse impact on reproduction. BHA is toxic to the immune system and the International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies it as a possible human carcinogen. Studies suggest that BHT may be toxic to the skin, lungs, liver, and immune system. Both chemicals can cause allergic reactions, are suspected of interfering with hormone function (endocrine disruption), and may promote tumor growth.

Coal-Tar Dyes

What is it? Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of chemicals that occur naturally in coal, crude oil and gasoline. One of the more common PAHs is naphthalene. Some cosmetics and shampoos are made with coal tar and therefore may contain PAHs.

Why is it harmful? Phenylenediamine, used in hair dyes, has been found to be carcinogenic in laboratory tests conducted by the U.S. National Cancer Institute and National Toxicology Program. Coal tar is recognized as a human carcinogen and the main concern are their potential as carcinogens. As well, colors may be contaminated with low levels of heavy metals and some contain aluminum (a neurotoxin). This is of particular concern when used in cosmetics that may be ingested, like lipstick.

DEA Compounds (diethanolamine)

What is it? DEA and DEA compounds are used to make cosmetics creamy or sudsy.

Why is it harmful? These cause mild skin and eye irritation. Exposure to high doses of these chemicals has caused liver cancers and pre-cancerous changes in skin and thyroid. DEA is also possible hormone disruptor, has shown limited evidence of carcinogenicity and depletes the body of choline needed for fetal brain development..

Fragrance/Parfum

What is it? Apart from being used in perfumes and deodorants, they are used in nearly every type of personal-care product. Of the thousands of chemicals used in fragrances, most have not been tested for toxicity, alone or in combination. Over 3000 chemicals are used to manufacture synthetic fragrances.

Why is it harmful? These are often unlisted ingredients that are irritants and can trigger allergies, migraines, and asthma symptoms. The catchall term “fragrance” may mask phthalates, which act as endocrine disruptors and may cause obesity and reproductive and developmental harm. In laboratory experiments, individual fragrance ingredients have been associated with cancer and neurotoxicity. For example, one chemical of concern is dimethyl phthalate, or DEP. Widely used in cosmetics to make fragrances linger, DEP is suspected of interfering with hormone function (endocrine disruption), causing reproductive and developmental problems. Health Canada recently announced regulations banning six phthalates in children’s toys, but DEP is still widely used in cosmetics.

pEG compounds (polyethylene glycols)

What is it? PEGs are widely used in cosmetics as thickeners, solvents, softeners, and moisture-carriers and hence used for products requiring a cream base and also in laxatives. LEARN MORE HERE

Why is it harmful? PEG (and its chemical cousin, propylene glycol) opens the skin’s pores, allowing harmful ingredients to penetrate more deeply. PEG and other “ethoxylated” ingredients (which usually have chemical names including the letters “eth”) may be contaminated with ethylene oxide and 1,4-dioxane. Both contaminants may cause cancer. Also, ethylene oxide may harm the nervous system and interfere with human development, and 1,4-dioxane is persistent. In other words, it doesn’t easily degrade and can remain in the environment long after it is rinsed down the shower drain.

Petrolatum

What is it? Petrolatum (mineral oil jelly) is used as a barrier to lock moisture in the skin in a variety of moisturizers. It is also used in hair care products to make your hair shine. Look out for the terms “petroleum” or “liquid paraffin.” LEARN MORE HERE

Why is it harmful? A petrochemical, it can be contaminated with cancer-causing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The European Union considers petrolatum a carcinogen and restricts its use in cosmetics. 1,4-dioxane is not listed on ingredient labels. It is a petroleum-derived contaminant formed in the manufacture of shampoos, body wash, children’s bath products and other sudsing cosmetics. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has ranked it as a possible carcinogen, and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) has identified it as a reasonably anticipated carcinogen.

Siloxanes

What is it? Cyclomethicone and ingredients ending in “siloxane” make hair products dry quickly and deodorant creams slide on easily. They are also used extensively in moisturizers and facial treatments to soften and smoothen and in medical implants. LEARN MORE HERE

Why is it harmful? Cyclotetrasiloxane and Cylcopentasiloxane —D4 and D5 — are endocrine disruptors, interfere with human hormone function and possible reproductive toxicants that may impair human fertility, cause uterine tumors and harm the reproductive and immune systems.

Triclosan

What is it? Triclosan is used mainly in antiperspirants/deodorants, cleansers, and hand sanitizers as a preservative and an anti-bacterial agent. Also used in laundry detergent, facial tissues, and antiseptics for wounds. Triclosan is classified as a pesticide. LEARN MORE HERE

Why is it harmful? It can pass through skin and can affect the body’s hormone systems—especially thyroid hormones, which regulate metabolism—and may disrupt normal breast development. Widespread use of triclosan may also contribute to bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents. The Canadian Medical Association has called for a ban on antibacterial consumer products, such as those containing triclosan.

http://thechalkboardmag.com/common-toxic-cosmetic-ingredients-to-avoid


Top 10 Reasons to Avoid Sodium Lauryl Sulfate

 

There are a lot of rumors out there about Sodium Lauryl/Laureth Sulfate. Is it really a carcinogen? What about an endocrine disruptor and skin irritant? What’s truth and what’s myth? We’ve put together this article to clear up the confusion about the debated chemical. There’s no need to spread lies…the truth is scary enough. To make it easy we’re going to refer to Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and its even more evil twin, Sodium Laureth Sulfate from this point forward as SLS.

If you have the suspicion that washing your face is making your skin dry, or that shampooing is giving you an itchy scalp or making your eyes sting, or that cleaning your teeth is giving you mouth ulcers, sodium lauryl sulfate is the likely culprit. In studies, there are “significant correlations” (in the words of one) between SLS and contact dermatitis. The Journal of the American College of Toxicology says that it has “a degenerative effect on the cell membranes because of its protein denaturing properties”. The Journal adds that “high levels of skin penetration may occur at even low use concentration.

Here are our top ten reasons you should not use anything containing SLS.

1. It is a known skin irritant. When cosmetic companies need to test the healing properties of a lotion, they need toirritate the skin first. What do they use to do this? SLS, of course. If you have dandruff, dermatitis, canker sores, or other irritated tissues or skin, it could be due to SLS.

2. It pollutes our groundwater. It is toxic to fish and other aquatic animals and has the potential for bioaccumulation (meaning it accumulates in the bodies of the fish.)  It also is undetected in many municipal water filters, getting into the tap water that you drink.

3. It is actually a pesticide and herbicide.  It is commonly used to kill plants and insects. Makers of SLS recently petitioned to have SLS listed as an approved pesticide for organic farming.  The application was denied because of its polluting properties and environmental damage.

4. It emits toxic fumes when heated. Toxic Sodium Oxides and Sulfur Oxides are released when SLS is heated.  Makes a hot shower with an SLS shampoo seem not quite as nice…

5.  It has corrosive properties.  According to the American College of Toxicitythis includes corrosion of the fats and protiens that make up skin and muscle.  SLS can be found in garage floor cleanrs, engine degreasers, and car wsh soaps

6.  Long-term permeation of the body’s tissues.  A study from the University of Georgia Medicine showed that SLS had the power to permeate the eyes, brain, heart, and liver.

7.  It’s an eye irritant.  It was shown to cause cataracts in adults, and is proven to inhibit the proper formation of eyes in small children.

8.  Nitrate and other solvent contamination.  Toxic solvents, including carcinogenic nitrates are used in the manufacturing of SLS, traces of which can remain in the product.

9.  Manufacturing process is highly polluting, emitting cancer-causing volatile organic compounds, sulfur compounds, and air particulates.

10.  It helps other chemicals get into your body.  SLS is a penetration enhancer, meaning that its molecules are so small they’re able to cross the membranes of your body’s cells.  Once cells are compromised, they become more vulnerable to other toxic chemicals that may be with the SLS.

Sources:

NewsTarget “Popular Shampoos Contain Toxic Chemicals Linked to Nerve Damage” Mike Adams, January 11, 2005 

MSDS Data Sheet for Sodium Lauryl Sulfate

MSDS Data Sheet for Sodium Laureth Sulfate

“OCA & Cancer Prevention Coalition Warn of Hidden Carcinogens in Baby Care” AScribe Newswire, Feb 28, 2007

“Technical Evaluation Report: Sodium Lauryl Sulfate” Compiled by ICF Consulting for the USDA National Organic Program, February 10, 2006

Environmental Working Group / Skin Deep http://www.ewg.org/skindeep

The word “fragrance” can hide more than 3,000 toxins under the idea “trade secrets”.

Fragrance Free is what you are looking for. This means that no fragrances (artificial or otherwise) have been added to the product (or should mean that, watch for tougher regulations monitoring that coming).  As we know, artificial fragrances are the #1 irritant on skin and one of the most potentially harmful ingredients we can encounter - because they contain phthalates -- see more information below. They are linked to many health issues, from allergies and asthma to cancer.  In its truest definition, "fragrance free," means you should not have to worry about those nasty synthetics. Nothing should be added to remove the natural scents from the butters, oils, and other natural ingredients in the products.  In other words, you may smell some of the product’s ingredients such as the olive oil or shea butter.

Unscented does not mean fragrance free.  In fact, if you smell absolutely nothing in your skin care or beauty products, it may be more harmful than you believed. Why? It sounds silly, but "unscented" products typically have added fragrance agents used to mask the other smells. These masking fragrances are usually composed of toxic phthalates.



Phthalates are an industrial plasticizing agent.  This is found in artificial fragrance, and frequently used in "unscented" and some poorly labeled "fragrance free" products. Here is what is on the Cosmetics Database page about phthalates: “More than two decades ago, scientists began building a body of work indicating that phthalates are reproductive and developmental toxicants in laboratory animals, particularly in males. Early studies focused on phthalates’ ability to cause testicular atrophy (e.g., Gray and Buttersworth 1980). New studies are confirming these findings in humans (Swan et al. 2005, Main et al. 2005).”

Phthalates have been linked from everything to testicular cancer to liver cancer, but they are still in almost all synthetic fragrances, including masking agents which cause a product’s other natural scents to disappear.

Allergies and asthma still remain the biggest side effect of artificial fragrance and studies reveal that women are even more susceptible to these side effects. The problem becomes compounded when one exhibits the side effects such as redness and irritation and attempt to treat these with more lotions and creams.  Since so many of these products have fragrance in them, they are rubbing on more of what is actually causing the problem in the first place.

We at Seed are committed to offering Fragrance Free options in all of our products, and we recently updated our website to make our Fragrance Free products easier shop. Check it out now at http://www.seedbodycare.com/collections/fragrance-free

 

What are phthalates?

Phthalates are a group of chemicals used to soften and increase the flexibility of plastic and vinyl.  Polyvinyl chloride is made softer and more flexible by the addition of phthalates. Phthalates are used in hundreds of consumer products. 

Phthalates are used in cosmetics and personal care products, including perfume, hair spray, soap, shampoo, nail polish, and skin moisturizers. They are used in consumer products such as flexible plastic and vinyl toys, shower curtains, wallpaper, vinyl miniblinds, food packaging, and plastic wrap.

Phthalates are also used in wood finishes, detergents, adhesives, plastic plumbing pipes, lubricants, medical tubing and fluid bags, solvents, insecticides, medical devices, building materials, and vinyl flooring. 

Phthalates had been used to make pacifiers, soft rattles, and teethers, but at the request of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, U.S. manufacturers have not used phthalates in those products since 1999.

How might I be exposed to phthalates?

You can be exposed to low levels of phthalates through air, water, or food. You can be exposed to phthalates if you use cosmetics, personal care products, cleaning products, or other plastic and vinyl products that contain them. 

Exposure to low levels of phthalates may come from eating food packaged in plastic that contains phthalates or breathing dust in rooms with vinyl miniblinds, wallpaper, or recently installed flooring that contain phthalates. You could be exposed by drinking water that contains phthalates, though it is not known how common that is. Phthalates are suspected to be endocrine disruptors.

Children can be exposed to phthalates by chewing on soft vinyl toys or other products made with them. Children can be exposed by breathing household dust that contains phthalates or using IV tubing or other medical devices made with phthalates. 

People at the highest risk of exposure to phthalates are dialysis patients, hemophiliacs, or people who received blood transfusions from sources that use tubing or containers made with phthalates. The Food and Drug Administration has recommended steps to minimize exposure of patients to medical devices that contain phthalates and recommended use of alternative devices for certain procedures. Others at high risk are painters, printers, and workers exposed to phthalates during the manufacture, formulation, and processing of plastics.

How can phthalates affect my health?

The human health effects of phthalates are not yet fully known but are being studied by several government agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and the National Toxicology Program's Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction. 

Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate is listed as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen" in the Fourteenth Report on Carcinogens published by the National Toxicology Program because there is limited evidence of a relationship between exposure to the chemical and cancer in humans.

Current levels of seven phthalates studied by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences posed "minimal" concern for causing reproductive effects. However, the National Toxicology Program concluded that high levels of one phthalate, di-n-butyl phthalate, may adversely affect human reproduction or development.

High levels of exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate through the use of medical tubing and other plastic devices for feeding, medicating, and assisting the breathing of newborn infants may affect the development of the male reproductive system, according to the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

For poisoning emergencies or questions about possible poisons, please contact your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

This description is based on the information found in the Web links listed with this topic.


More Links
Check the Kind of Plastics You Use (Mount Sinai Children's Environmental Health Center) (PDF — 663.64 KB)
Cosmetics - Phthalates (Food and Drug Administration)
DEHP in Plastic Medical Devices (Food and Drug Administration)
Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP). ToxFAQs (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry)
Di-n-butyl Phthalate. ToxFAQs (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry)
Di-n-octylphthalate (DNOP). ToxFAQs (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry)
Diethyl Phthalate. ToxFAQs (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry)
Phthalate Esters. Haz-Map (National Library of Medicine)
Phthalates and Bisphenol A (Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units) (PDF — 196.10 KB)
Phthalates. Fact Sheet (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
PVC - A Major Source of Phthalates (New Jersey Department of Human Services)

Source: https://toxtown.nlm.nih.gov/text_version/chemicals.php?id=24

http://www.ifraorg.org/en-us/about-the-standards


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The dangers of synthetic scents aren’t always evident, but we have the science to prove that everyone, regardless of age or health, needs to make avoiding fake fragrances a major priority.

A National Academy of Sciences points out some vital facts: About 95 percent of chemicals used in synthetic fragrances are derived from petroleum (crude oil). They include benzene derivatives (carcinogenic), aldehydes, toluene and many other known toxic chemicals linked to cancer, birth defects, central nervous system disorders and allergic reactions.  Unfortunately, 30 years later, toxic ingredients continue turn up in products we use and breathe in on a daily basis. Some of the worst toxic ingredients used in lotions, shampoos, laundry detergents, cleaning products and so much more include synthetic scents, often listed as on labels as the elusive “fragrance.” And many on the list are known or suspected endocrine disruptors, compounds that tinker with hormonal health that can trigger weight gain and even set you up for diseases decades down the line.

Avoiding the dangers of synthetic scents is crucial. It’s something I need you to share with your family and friends. When a company puts “fragrance” on the label, don’t be tricked. This is a catch-all term actually can stand for thousands of different ingredients (literally, at least 3,000). And when you use a product containing “fragrance” or “parfum,” all of those mysterious ingredients are absorbed right into your bloodstream. These ingredients are predominantly made from chemicals and are just outright toxic for your health in so many ways.

While our allure with natural fragrances is baked into our DNA as a way to find food and mates, synthetic fragrances are completely unnecessary and are making us super sick in our modern-day world. Sure, drawing fragrances from nature has a long history in religious ceremonies, burials and a way to increase libido. But in this article, we’re focusing on the man-made fragrances that started emerging in the late 1800s. The dangers of these synthetic scents not only include short-term symptoms like allergies and respiratory distress, but also headaches, dizziness, nausea and brain fog. We’ll get into other, less obvious side (but super serious) side effects in a bit.  This serves as evidence that regardless of your age or health status, it is imperative that you avoid fragrance chemicals.

 

What Are Synthetic Scents?

Synthetic scents or “fragrance” represent an unidentified mixture of ingredients including carcinogens, allergens, respiratory irritants, endocrine disruptors, neurotoxic chemicals and environmental toxicants. These artificial scents can can be found in all kinds of body care and cosmetic products, as well as air fresheners, cleaning materials and laundry detergents. According to the Campaign for Safer Cosmetics, hair products are especially problematic. More than 95 percent of shampoos, conditioners and styling products contain fragrance as an ingredient.  I’m sure you’ll agree that we all want our hair to smell good, but we could do without the use of toxic ingredients.

Research conducted by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) and the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics found an average of 14 chemicals in 17 name brand fragrance products. But it doesn’t stop there — none of these chemicals were actually listed on the label.

In general, there at least 3,000 ingredients that could possibly be used to form a product’s scent. That’s according to the online “Transparency List” put out by the International Fragrance Association, an industry trade group.  I encourage to take a look at the following list, derived from the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, to see just how many fragrance chemicals we’re possibly exposed to every day.




It may seem unbelievable, but the FDA does not even currently require fragrance and cosmetic makers to disclose exactly what they are using to scent products. If companies are using truly natural ingredients, then why be shy? Many will say that their formulas are proprietary and they don’t want other companies copying them. The FDA website also states how the agency cannot legally require companies to warn about allergens in cosmetic like they do with food.

Are you wondering why companies would continue to use synthetic scents if they’re so bad for our health? The answer is straightforward — they are cheaper. Synthetic scents can be an extremely cheap way to give everything from shampoo to lotion to candles a desirable scent. Unfortunately, just because you enjoy a scent, doesn’t mean it’s good for you.

 

Fake Fragrances: Making People’s Lives Miserable

In an August 2016 study published by veteran fragrance chemical researcher Anne Steinemann, PhD, we see the scope of how scented products impact our daily lives. But here’s a positive stat from the study: She found that more than 50 percent of the population would prefer fragrance-free workplaces, health care facilities and professionals, hotels and airplanes.

  • Overall reported health problems after exposure to fake fragrance:Overall, 34 percent of the population reported one or more types of adverse health effects from exposure to fragranced products. The most common symptoms were: 18 percent respiratory problems; 16 percent mucosal symptoms; 15 percent migraine headaches; 10 percent skin problems; 8 percent asthma attacks; 7 percent neurological problems; 5 percent cognitive problems; 5 percent gastrointestinal problems; 4 percent cardiovascular problems; 4 percent immune system problems; 3 percent musculoskeletal problems; and 1 percent “other.”
  • Scented laundry products vented outdoors: 12 percent reported health problems from the scent of laundry products coming from a dryer vent. Symptoms include headaches, breathing difficulties and other health problems.
  • Proximity to fragranced person: 23 percent reported health problems from being near someone who is wearing a fragranced product.
  • Trouble in public places: 17 percent of people say they are unable or reluctant to use public toilets because of air freshener, deodorizer or scented product; 14 percent are unable or reluctant to their wash hands with soap in a public place because they suspect the soap is fragranced. Further, 22.7 percent have been prevented from going to some public place because of scented products.
  • Economic losses: Fragranced product exposures have economic implications, too. Of those surveyed, 20 percent would enter but then leave a business as quickly as possible if they smell fragranced products, and 15 have lost workdays or a job due to fragranced product exposures in the workplace.

Clearly, the United States is ready for fragrance-free policies. Share these facts with your employers, favorite businesses and local government to encourage fragrance-free policies.

 

Serious Dangers of Synthetic Scents

 

Cancer

According to the Breast Cancer Fund, when it comes to the prevention of cancer, avoiding synthetic fragrance is one of the main ways to help yourself. That’s because the dangers of synthetic scents include hormone-disrupting phthalates and synthetic musks.

The National Academy of Sciences endorsed the 2011 finding by the National Toxicology Program, a collaboration of scientists from several government agencies, that styrene is “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen” based on “compelling evidence.” The organization also said that some studies would support “a strong argument [for] listing styrene as a known human carcinogen.

Styrene is found in cigarette smoke and car exhaust. Doesn’t sound like it would smell too good, but shockingly, it’s actually being used in cosmetic sprays and liquids as well as cleaning products. According to the EWG, if a company doesn’t fully disclose that it contains styrene (which it most likely will not) then the only way you’ll know it’s present is if you use a gas chromatograph or mass spectrometer.

Sadly, styrene is just one of many ingredients linked to cancer being used to create artificial fragrance. Phthalates are another group of  chemicals often disguised as “fragrance.” They are connected to cancer, endocrine disruption as well as developmental and reproductive toxicity. These dangerous synthetics are already banned from cosmetics in the European Union, but are still quite common in products produced and sold in the United States. Phthalates often hide under the “fragrance” ingredient, but they can also appear on ingredient lists as phthalate, DEP, DBP, and DEHP. Be sure to avoid all of those.

Child Autism & Other Birth Defects

Most products that list “fragrance” contain a very unwanted ingredient when it comes to good health. I’m talking about phthalates, again. Research conducted by Dr. Philip J. Landrigan of the Mount Sinai Children’s Environmental Health Center demonstrates that fetal exposure to phthalates is linked to autism, symptoms of ADHD and neurological disorders. This why pregnant women have to be ultra careful when it comes to the products they’re exposed to on a daily basis. The dangers of synthetic scents could be even more life-altering for a developing fetus.

A 2010 New York Times article quoted Dr. Landrigan on the subject. He said that he is “increasingly confident that autism and other ailments are, in part, the result of the impact of environmental chemicals on the brain as it is being formed.” He adds, “the crux of this is brain development. If babies are exposed in the womb or shortly after birth to chemicals that interfere with brain development, the consequences last a lifetime.”

A very interesting 2010 peer-reviewed study published in Environmental Health Perspectives found that women with higher levels of certain phthalates gave birth to children that, years later, were more likely to display disruptive behavior.  It’s alarmingly true that fragrance materials are able to accumulate in human fat tissue. They are also present in breast milk.

Allergic & Toxic Bodily Reactions

Fragrances are one of the top five allergens in the world.  Allergic reactions include headaches and migraines, difficulty breathing and sinus irritation, just to name a few. Fragrance mixtures also commonly trigger contact dermatitis, a type of allergic skin reaction. In recent years, health reports show that allergies, sinus problems, migraines and asthma have all increased dramatically. Many experts believe there’s a likely link between the rise in these conditions and the increased use of products containing fragrance.

Using animal models, a 1998 study published in Archives of Environmental Health looked at how fragrance products produce toxic effects in mammals. They found that the emissions of fragrance products caused various combinations of: eyes, nose and throat irritations; pulmonary irritation; decreases in airflow velocity when exhaling; and signs of neurotoxicity. This neurotoxicity was even worse when the animal subjects suffered repeated exposure to the scented products.

Asthma & Other Breathing Difficulties

If you have asthma, you really don’t need anything to get in the way of breathing easily.  It’s extremely common for asthmatics to suffer health symptoms when exposed to perfumes, colognes and other scented products, especially when they contain artificial scents.

One study looked at patients with a history of worsening asthma symptoms after being exposed to cologne. They found that the patients’ exhalation volume decline by 18 to 58 percent during cologne exposure.

There’s no doubt in my mind that synthetic scents are enemies of optimal breathing, especially if you have breathing issues to begin with, like asthmatics. If you have asthma or any other breathing trouble, then truly fragrance-free products are your best bet.

Better Alternatives to Dangerous Synthetic Scents

The good news is that if you are a careful reader, you can help yourself and your family to avoid the dangers of synthetic scents in all of the products you buy and use.

There are also many better options and ways to avoid the dangers of synthetic scents including:

  • Just live with fewer fragrances in your life. One easy solution to freshen your air? Put a bowl of white vinegar your countertop or windowsill to aid in natural odor control. Be sure to focus on cleaning up the source of odor, though, too — not just covering up the foul smell.
  • Completely avoiding any product that lists fragrance, parfum, phthalate, DEP, DBP, or DEHP as an ingredient.
  • Look for products that use essential oilswhen you are looking for a scent.
  • Buying certified organic products, which are less likely to include artificial scents (but still read labels). Watch out for “limonene” or “linalool” on labels, too. When they are listed in this form on the label, they are likely synthetic, man-made versions, not the natural compounds part of a more complex organic essential oil.
  • To provide a fresh, natural scent to your home or office, use fresh cut herbs and flowers and potted plants. Studies have even shown that the best houseplants that remove pollutionhelp strip indoor air of some toxic compounds.
  • Make homemade cleaning products since they are another huge source of synthetic scents.
  • Buy laundry detergent that is scented with pure essential oils or that is fragrance-free. You can also make your own homemade laundry soap.
  • If you are super sensitive or just don’t want to deal with smelling anything at all then choose fragrance-free or unscented products. Just make sure to still read labels carefully because sometimes companies will use other questionable ingredients to create that lack of a scent.
  • If you want to burn an occasional candle, use beeswax with a lead-free wick. But understand that any type of combustion will cause some level of particulate pollution in the home. (But at least you won’t get the toxic fragrance or petroleum chemicals.)
  • Question companies that don’t fully explain how their products are scented. Maybe you’ll get some additional information or at best, get them to think again before not fully informing their customers.
  • Share the stats in this article with your employer and favorite businesses. Let them know about the economic harms of allowing fragrances in public and work spaces.

High quality, 100 percent pure essential oils are not cheap like synthetic scents, but for good reason. Essential oils are extremely concentrated. It takes a 1,000 pounds of handpicked flowers from an orange tree to produce the neroli essential oil, which has an incredible floral and citrusy intoxicating scent. Neroli is just one of many awesome options when it comes to essential oils.

Also, make sure to avoid synthetic scents with pet products, since the dangers of synthetic scents can be similar for animals.

Final Thoughts on the Dangers of Synthetic Scents

I really want to emphasize how important it is that you and your loved ones avoid the dangers of synthetic scents as much as possible. I also want to remind you again about what’s so much better than those fake smells — essentials oils. With so many scents to choose from and combine, the options for lovely natural scents are practically endless. They even make plug-ins now that use essential oils.

Interestingly, people who are heavy users of fake fragrances seem to build up a tolerance to them. But as you give up the dangers of synthetic scents, you’ll likely become less tolerant of them. So many people tell me that after they detox from chemical fragrances, they often feel sick when they walk down the detergent aisle or body spray sections of stores.

One of the best ways to protect your overall health is to choose products that are truly free of fragrance or ones that fully disclose a natural fragrance ingredients. Pregnant and breastfeeding moms should be especially careful for the sake of themselves as well as their developing children.

You really have to read labels to know what you’re getting these days when it comes to everything, especially any scented product. If you have asthma or breathing problems and are currently using synthetic scents, you are very likely to notice a big difference when you remove these fake fragrances from your life. Some of the other health effects might be less obvious, but the science is there to demonstrate how the more you cut out the dangers of synthetic scents from your life, the more you can hopefully decrease your chances of some serious and chronic health problems.

So toss those synthetic scents in the trash immediately and go smell a flower and remember how the best scents are truly all around us in nature, and bottled in essential oils too.

Here is a Chart of the Food Colors

Disclaimer: First of all, I'd like to say, Don't believe a word I say. This reference is not validated by any anyone, and what's worse it's on the Internet of all places! Can you really believe anything here? Probably not. With that said here is my list of 100% true data regarding food dyes!

Well, there really isn't anything all that shocking about food dye, but everyone likes to think there is. Yes there have been a few problems. Red 2 and Red 3 Lake are known to cause cancer, but were widely used for years. Yellow 5 causes hives in certain people (but does not make you sterile). Many dyes have been banned by the FDA, the same company who approved them in the first place. Aside from that, everything is regulated quite well in my opinion.

First allow me to go over a few terms about food dyes so we're all on the same page.



Dye -
An additive into a food/drug/cosmetic/etc. that will alter the color of the item. Used often for safety reason, but more commonly to enhance the visual appeal of the item.
FDA -
The Food and Drug Administration. This is the company who controls which dyes are approved, or banned. They also are part of the government. Don't you just trust them more and more.
Lake -
While most dyes are water soluble, lake dyes are water-insoluble. That means that lake dyes will not bleed or run together because they do not dissolve in water very well.
Approved -
A dye that is approved means the FDA declares it safe for use. There are several different areas that a dye can get approved in. They include foods, drugs, cosmetics, cosmetics around the eye, medical equipment, contact lenses, etc. The number after Approved, is the year it was approved. If there is a question mark (?), I couldn't find when.


Banned - If the dye isn't approved it is often banned, in one or more the the same areas it can be approved in.

With that out of the way, here is the big old color dye table.

Name

Food Status

Drug Status

Cosmetic Status

Notes

Used In

Black 1

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Blue 1
Brilliant Blue FCF

Approved: 1969

Approved: 1969

Approved: 1982

Eye Area Approved: 1994
Manganese Dioxide (MnO2) Approved in 1993.

Color is Bright Blue
Beverages, dairy products powders, jellies, confections, condiments, icings, syrups, extracts

Blue 1 Lake

Approved: ?

Approved: ?

?

Eye Are Approved: 1994

?

Blue 2
Indigotine

Approved: 1987

Approved: 1987

?

Nylon Sutures Approved: 1971 (Limit 1% by weight)

Color is Royal Blue
Baked goods, cereals, snack foods, ice cream, confections, cherries, nylon surgical sutures

Blue 2 Lake

?

?

?

?

?

Blue 3

?

?

?

?

?

Blue 4

?

?

Approved: 1977

?

?

Blue 5

?

?

?

?

?

Blue 6

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Various Sutures Approved: 1978 and 1985 Limit 2.5% by weight)

Surgical Sutures

Blue 7

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Blue 8

?

?

?

?

?

Blue 9

?

?

?

Cotton and Silk Sutures Approved: 1974 (Limit 2.5% by weight)

?

Brown 1

?

Approved: ?

Approved: ?

?

?

Green 1

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Green 2

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

?

?

Green 3
Fast Green FCF

Approved: 1982

Approved: 1982

Approved: 1982

?

Color is Sea Green.
Beverages, puddings, ice cream, sherbert, cherries, confections, baked goods, dairy products

Green 3 Lake

Approved: 1982

Approved: 1982

Approved: 1982

?

?

Green 4

?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Green 5

?

Approved: 1982

Approved: 1982

Eye Area Approved:1994
Nylon 66 Nonabsorbable Sutures Approved: 1973 (Limit 0.6% by weight)
Nylon 6 Nonabsorbable Sutures Approved: 1977 (Limit 0.6% by weight)

Nylon 66 Nonabsorbable Sutures, Nylon 6 Nonabsorbable Sutures

Green 6

?

?

Approved: 1982

Various Sutures Approved: 1963 and 1875 (Limit varies)
Contact Lens Approved: 1983 (Limit 0.1%)
Uniform Specitications Approved: 1986.
Haptics of Intraocular Lenses Approved: 1993 (Limit 0.1%)

Surigical sutures, contact lenses, intraocular lenses

Green 7

?

?

?

?

?

Green 8

?

?

Approved: 1976 (Limit 0.01% of finished product)

?

?

Orange 1

?

?

Approved: ?
Banned: ?

Contact Lens Approved: ?

Contact lenses

Orange 2

?

?

?

?

?

Orange 3

?

Approved: ?
Banned: ?

Approved: ?
Banned: ?

?

?

Orange 4

?

?

Approved: 1977

?

?

Orange 5
Dibromofluorescein

?

?

Approved: 1984 (Limit 5% per day)

Mouthwash/Toothpaste Approved: 1982

?

Orange 6

?

?

?

?

?

Orange 7

?

?

?

?

?

Orange 8

?

?

Approved: ?
Banned: ?

?

?

Orange 9

?

?

?

?

?

Orange 10

?

?

Approved: 1981

?

?

Orange 11

?

?

Approved: 1981

?

?

Orange 12

?

Approved: ?
Banned: ?

Approved: ?
Banned: ?

?

?

Orange 13

?

?

?

?

?

Orange 14

?

Approved: ?
Banned: ?

Approved: ?
Banned: ?

?

?

Orange 15

?

Approved: ?
Banned: ?

Approved: ?
Banned: ?

?

?

Orange 16

?

Approved: ?
Banned: ?

Approved: ?
Banned: ?

?

?

Orange 17

?

Approved: ?
Banned: ?

Approved: ?
Banned: ?

?

?

Orange B

Approved: 1996 (Only used in hotdog/sasuage casings)

?

?

?

Hotdog/sausage casings

Citrus Red 2

Approved: 1963 (Only used in orange peels)

?

?

?

Orange peels

Red 1

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 2
Amaranth

Approved: ?
BANNED: 2/13/1976

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Large amounts caused tumors in female rats

?

Red 3
Erythrosine

Approved: 1969

Approved: 1969

?

?

Color is Cherry Red
Mercino Cherries, canned fruits for salads, confections, baked goods, dairy products, snack foods

Red 3 Lake

Approved: ?
BANNED: 2/1/1990

Approved: ?
BANNED: 2/1/1990

Approved: ?
BANNED: 2/1/1990

Large amounts supposed to cause thyroid tumors in male rats

?

Red 4

Approved: ?
BANNED: 9/23/1976

Approved: ?
BANNED: 9/23/1976

Approved: 1976

?

?

Red 5

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 6

?

Approved: 1983 (Limit combined with Red 7, 5mg a day)

Approved: 1983

?

?

Red 7

?

Approved: 1983 (Limit combined with Red 6, 5mg a day)

Approved: 1983

?

?

Red 7 Lake

?

?

?

?

?

Red 8
Brilliant Scarlet

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 9

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 10
Azorubine
Carmoisine

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 11
Fast Crimson GR
Acid Red #1

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 12

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 13

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 14

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 15

?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 16

?

?

?

?

?

Red 17

?

?

Approved: 1976

Contact Lens Approved: 1990

Contact lenses

Red 18

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 19

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 20

?

?

?

?

?

Red 21
tetrabromofluorescein

?

Approved: 1983

Approved: 1982

?

?

Red 21 Lake

?

?

?

?

?

Red 22
Eosine

?

Approved: 1983

Approved: 1982

?

?

Red 23

?

?

?

?

?

Red 24

?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 25

?

?

?

?

?

Red 26

?

?

?

?

?

Red 27

?

Approved: 1982

Approved: 1982

?

?

Red 28

?

?

?

?

?

Red 29

?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 30

?

Approved: 1982

Approved: 1982

?

?

Red 30 Lake

?

?

?

?

?

Red 31

?

?

Approved: 1976

?

?

Red 32

?

?

?

?

?

Red 33

?

Approved: 1988 (Limit 0.75 mg per day)

Approved: 1988 (Limit 3% of finished product)

Mouthwash/Toothpaste Approved: 1988 (Limit 3% by weight)

Mouthwash, toothpaste

Red 33 Lake

?

?

?

?

?

Red 34

?

?

Approved: 1976

?

?

Red 35

?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 36

?

Approved: 1969 (Limit 0.75mg per day)

Approved: 1988 (Limit 3% of finished product)

?

?

Red 37

?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 38

?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Red 39

?

?

Approved: 1966 (Limit 0.1% of finished product)

?

?

Red 40
Allura Red AC

Approved: ?

Approved: 1971

Approved: 1975

Eye Area Approved: 1994
The most commonly used dye.

Color is Orange-Red
Gelatins, beverages, dairy products and condiments.

Red 40 Lake

Approved: ?

Approved: ?

Approved: ?

Eye Area Approved: 1994

?

Violet 1

Approved: ?
BANNED: 4/10/1973

Approved: ?
BANNED: 4/10/1973

?

?

?

Violet 2

?

Approved: 1976

Approved: 1976

Various Sutures Approved: 1974, 1980, 1993, 1994, 1998, 2000 (Limit Varies)
Contact Lens Approved: 1987
Introcular Lens Haptics Approved: 1990 (Limit 0.2% by weight)
Meniscal Tacks Approved: 1999 (Limit 0.15% by weight)

Surgical sutures, contact lenses, introcular lenses, meniscal tacks

Yellow 1

?

?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Yellow 2

?

?

?

?

?

Yellow 3

?

?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Yellow 4

?

?

?

?

?

Yellow 5
Tartrazine

Approved: 1969

Approved: 1969

Approved: 1985

Eye Area Approved: 1994
May cause itching or hives. Second most commonly used dye

Color is Lemon Yellow
Custards, beverages, Mountain Dew!, ice cream, confections, preserves, cereals

Yellow 5 Lake

Approved: ?

?

?

Eye Area Approved: 1994

?

Yellow 6
Sunset Yellow

Approved: 1986

Approved: 1986

Approved: 1986

?

Color is orange
Cereals, baked goods, snack foods, ice cream, beverages, dessert powders, confections

Yellow 6 Lake

?

?

?

?

?

Yellow 7

?

?

Approved: 1976

?

?

Yellow 8

?

?

Approved: 1976

?

?

Yellow 9

?

?

Approved: ?
BANNED: ?

?

?

Yellow 10
Quinoline Yellow
Acid Yellow #3
Food Yellow #13

?

Approved: 1983

Approved: 1983

Contact Lens Approved: 1987

Contact lenses, Toothpaste

Yellow 10 Lake

?

?

?

?

?

Yellow 11

?

?

Approved: 1976

?

?

Phew, what a lot to type in! If you are wondering where I got all this information from, I got it from the FDA themselves. You can even check my data by visiting them at: www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/col-toc.html. Enjoy.

Source: http://www.thealmightyguru.com/Pointless/FoodDye.html

Perfume Can Be Poisonous

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfloNXKeyX8

 

 

YELLOW 10

What Is It?

In cosmetics and personal care products, Yellow 10 (D&C Yellow No. 10) is used in the formulation of a wide variety of products. Yellow 10 Lake is used in blushers, hair bleaches, hair dyes and colors, lipsticks and makeup.

Why is it used in cosmetics and personal care products?

Yellow 10 and Yellow 10 Lake impart color to cosmetics and personal care products.

Scientific Facts: 

Yellow 10 and Yellow 10 Lake are synthetic pigments.

Safety Information: 

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has reviewed the safety of Yellow 10 and Yellow 10 Lake determined that these ingredients may be safely used for coloring cosmetics and personal care products including products intended to be used on the lips. These ingredients not permitted for use in products intended for use in the area of the eye. Yellow 10 is also permitted to be used as a color in drugs. According to U.S. regulations, all Yellow 10 and Yellow 10 Lake that are manufactured for use in products is subject to certification by the FDA. This certification process ensures that the strict chemical and identity specifications set by FDA are met. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) has deferred evaluation of these ingredients because the safety has been assessed by FDA. This deferral of review is according to the provisions of the CIR Procedures.

More safety Information: 

All color additives used in foods, drugs and cosmetics in the United States must be approved by FDA and listed in the Code of Federal Regulations. In some cases, FDA requires that each batch of color produced for use in regulated products can be used only if certified by the agency to meet strict specifications. FDA maintains a laboratory especially for this purpose and color manufacturers must pay a fee to support this activity. FDA only approves colors after extensive review of all safety data and publication of the basis for its approval in the Federal Register.

You can find out more about FDA regulation of colors at: http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/cos-col.html (link is external)

Link to FDA Code of Federal Regulations for Yellow 10

  • http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr... (link is external)
  • http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr... (link is external)

Yellow 10 is listed as CI 47005 in the Cosmetics Directive of the European Union and is a colouring agent allowed for use in all cosmetics and personal care products when purity requirements are fulfilled (see Annex IV). When used in cosmetic products in the European Union, this ingredient must be called CI 47005.

Link to the EU Cosmetic Regulation: 
http://europa.eu/legislation_summaries/consumers/product_labelling_and_p... (link is external)

You can learn more about the regulation and labeling of colors at: 
http://www.personalcarecouncil.org/colors-cosmetics-regulation-and-nomen... (link is external)

More scientific Information: 

Yellow 10 is a mixture of the disodium salt of the mono- and disulfuric acids of 2(2-quinolyl)-1H-indene-1,3(2H)-dione. Yellow 10 Lake is the salt of Yellow 10 extended on an appropriate substrate.

Source: http://www.cosmeticsinfo.org/ingredient/yellow-10

The IFRA Standards form the basis for the globally accepted and recognized risk management system for the safe use of fragrance ingredients and are part of the IFRA Code of Practice. This is the self-regulating system of the industry, based on risk assessments carried out by an independent Expert Panel.
 
The Expert Panel is made up of renowned independent experts from the fields such as dermatology, toxicology, pathology and environmental sciences. Their role is to evaluate the data on a fragrance ingredient to see if it supports the current use level, to make sure that there is no risk for the consumer. In cases where the safety assessment does not support the current use, the Panel instructs IFRA to issue a Standard either restricting or banning a material.
 
The Standards amount to 186 substances which have been either banned or restricted in their use in fragrance products. All members of IFRA are required, as a condition of membership, to observe the IFRA Code of Practice. The fragrance industry spends approximately $8 million (annually) in joint research on the safety of fragrances, and much more at the individual company level.
 
IFRA provides information on the exposure situation (usage concentration, variety of use, volume of use), chemical composition as well as the olfactory profile and olfactory potential (importance) of a fragrance ingredient to the Research Institute for Fragrance Materials (RIFM). RIFM is the fragrance industry’s scientific centre, preparing comprehensive dossiers on the materials including all available safety data. If necessary, RIFM initiates and organizes any missing safety studies on the fragrance ingredient.
 
The Standards are established according to the following process:
 
1. IFRA provides information on the exposure situation (usage concentration, variety of use, volume of use), chemical composition as well as the olfactory profile and olfactory potential (importance) of a fragrance ingredient to RIFM;
 
2. RIFM prepares a comprehensive dossier on the material including all available safety data and, if necessary, initiates and organizes any missing safety studies on the fragrance ingredient;
 
3. The RIFM Panel of independent experts, evaluates the data to see if it supports the current use level, to make sure that there is no risk/danger for the consumer; if the safety assessment does not support the current use, the Panel instructs IFRA to issue a Standard*;
 
4. IFRA prepares a Standard in accordance with the Panel's instructions and conclusions;
 
5. The draft Standard is consulted with the IFRA membership and stakeholders for a period of about a month, to ensure that IFRA/RIFM are aware of all data on the material and to provide holders of additional data that might alter the outcome of the Panel's risk assessment with the opportunity to share those with IFRA/RIFM;
 
6. If no additional information is received via the Consultation phase, the final Standard is published in a notification procedure as part of an “Amendment to the IFRA Code of Practice”.
 

* The final decision on the content of the Standard is solely in the hands of the Expert Panel, not IFRA or RIFM.

http://www.ifraorg.org/en-us/about-the-standards


Top 10 Reasons to Avoid Sodium Lauryl Sulfate

 

There are a lot of rumors out there about Sodium Lauryl/Laureth Sulfate. Is it really a carcinogen? What about an endocrine disruptor and skin irritant? What’s truth and what’s myth? We’ve put together this article to clear up the confusion about the debated chemical. There’s no need to spread lies…the truth is scary enough. To make it easy we’re going to refer to Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and its even more evil twin, Sodium Laureth Sulfate from this point forward as SLS.

If you have the suspicion that washing your face is making your skin dry, or that shampooing is giving you an itchy scalp or making your eyes sting, or that cleaning your teeth is giving you mouth ulcers, sodium lauryl sulfate is the likely culprit. In studies, there are “significant correlations” (in the words of one) between SLS and contact dermatitis. The Journal of the American College of Toxicology says that it has “a degenerative effect on the cell membranes because of its protein denaturing properties”. The Journal adds that “high levels of skin penetration may occur at even low use concentration.

Here are our top ten reasons you should not use anything containing SLS.

  1. 1. It is a known skin irritant. When cosmetic companies need to test the healing properties of a lotion, they need toirritate the skin first. What do they use to do this? SLS, of course. If you have dandruff, dermatitis, canker sores, or other irritated tissues or skin, it could be due to SLS.
  2. 2. It pollutes our groundwater. It is toxic to fish and other aquatic animals and has the potential for bioaccumulation (meaning it accumulates in the bodies of the fish.)  It also is undetected in many municipal water filters, getting into the tap water that you drink.
  3. 3. It is actually a pesticide and herbicide.  It is commonly used to kill plants and insects. Makers of SLS recently petitioned to have SLS listed as an approved pesticide for organic farming.  The application was denied because of its polluting properties and environmental damage.
  4. 4. It emits toxic fumes when heated. Toxic Sodium Oxides and Sulfur Oxides are released when SLS is heated.  Makes a hot shower with an SLS shampoo seem not quite as nice…
  5. 5.  It has corrosive properties.  According to the American College of Toxicitythis includes corrosion of the fats and protiens that make up skin and muscle.  SLS can be found in garage floor cleanrs, engine degreasers, and car wash soaps.

    6.  Long-term permeation of the body’s tissues.
     A study from the University of Georgia Medicine showed that SLS had the power to permeate the eyes, brain, heart, and liver.
  6. 7.  It’s an eye irritant.  It was shown to cause cataracts in adults, and is proven to inhibit the proper formation of eyes in small children.
  7. 8.  Nitrate and other solvent contamination.  Toxic solvents, including carcinogenic nitrates are used in the manufacturing of SLS, traces of which can remain in the product.
  8. 9.  Manufacturing process is highly polluting, emitting cancer-causing volatile organic compounds, sulfur compounds, and air particulates.

    10.  It helps other chemicals get into your body.  
    SLS is a penetration enhancer, meaning that its molecules are so small they’re able to cross the membranes of your body’s cells.  Once cells are compromised, they become more vulnerable to other toxic chemicals that may be with the SLS.

Does it cause cancer?
SLS is not a recognized carcinogen itself, but there is some truth behind those internet rumors.  When SLS is mixed with triethanolamine (or T.E.A) carcinogenic substances called nitrosames can form and be released.

Products commonly found to contains Sodium Lauryl Sulfate or SLES
Soaps
Shampoos
Bubble-baths
Tooth paste
Washing-up liquid / dish soap
Laundry detergent
Childrens soaps / shampoos
Stain Remover
Carpet Cleaner
Fabric glue
Body wash
Shave cream
Mascara
Mouthwash
Skin cleanser
Moisture lotion / Moisturiser
Sun Cream

Unfortunately, there are over 150 different names by which it is known. Many products that are SLS-free will say it on the packaging, however it is wise to always study the ingredients. For cosmetics check to see the toxicity of your product with EWG’s Skin Deep Data Base.


Is fragrance bad for skin?

The way most fragrance ingredients impart scent is through a volatile reaction, which almost always causes irritation and some amount of inflammation. Research has established that fragrances in skin-care products are among the most common cause of sensitizing and allergic reactions.Nov 23, 2010

Fragrance in Skincare Products – Bad for Your Skin ...

https://askanesthetician.wordpress.com/.../fragrance-in-skincare-products-bad-for-your-s...

Search for: Is fragrance bad for skin?

 

NOTE: This is the stuff I use and using it to make my own Shampoo, Toothpaste and Laundry detergent.

 

23 Reasons Why Castile Soap Is The Most Useful Soap You Can Buy

Source: https://www.onegoodthingbyjillee.com/uses-for-castile-soap

Castile soap used to be tricky to find, but today you can find it in nearly every health food store, and even in some regular grocery stores too! This naturally-derived soap is growing in popularity, and it’s no wonder why! There are just so many different ways to use it, from head-to-toe body care to every day household cleaning, laundry, and pet care. Plus, a little of this soap goes a long way, making it a good buy for the money.

Many of you are probably already familiar with what castile soap is. But just in case you aren’t, or could use a refresher, here’s a brief rundown. Castile soap is soap made from vegetable oil, rather than from animal fat or synthetic detergents. It originates from the Castile region of Spain (hence the name,) where it was made from pure, local olive oil. Although olive oil is the traditional base oil, the soap can be made with coconut, hemp, avocado, almond, walnut, and many other vegetable oils.


Modern castile soap is concentrated, completely biodegradable, and cleans gently, yet effectively. It can be used in a dizzying number of different ways, and today I’ll be sharing a few of my favorites!

 

23 Brilliant Uses for Castile Soap

 

Nourishing Body Wash

If you don’t want to use castile soap on its own to get clean, you can still use it to make a great body wash! Just mix it with a bit of honey, and some oils to make a gentle body wash that will moisturize and nourish your skin. Get the full recipe below!

Related: How to Make A Natural Body Wash With Just 4 Ingredients

All-Purpose Cleaning Spray

Add 1/4 cup of castile soap to 1 quart of warm water, and stir to incorporate. Add essential oils for added cleaning power, if desired, like lemon or melaleuca oils. (Or you could use Dr. Bronner’s Tea Tree Castile Soap, which already has melaleuca oil in it!) Pour the soapy solution into a spray bottle, and use it to clean surfaces all over your home!

Reusable Kitchen Wipes

Those antibacterial wipes are certainly convenient for wiping down countertops and other surfaces in your kitchen, but they can also be pretty expensive (and not to mention wasteful!) But with a little castile soap, you can make your very own kitchen cleaning wipes that are totally reusable! Get the full instructions on how to make them at the link below.

Related: Make Your Own Reusable Peppermint Kitchen Wipes

Fruit & Veggie Wash

Castile soap makes a great washing solution to clean your fresh produce. Fill your sink or a large bowl with water, then add 1/4 teaspoon of castile soap. Dunk your produce into the water and swish around to knock any dirt or debris loose. Then rinse your produce with clean, cool water. Quick and easy!

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Coconut Milk Shampoo

Castile soap plays a starring role in my homemade coconut milk shampoo! Just mix together a bit castile soap, some coconut milk, and a few oils, and you’ve got yourself a nourishing shampoo your hair will love! Get the full recipe at the link below.

Related: How To Make Your Own Coconut Milk & Coconut Milk Shampoo

Ant Spray

Make a castile soap spray to help deter ants. Add 1/4 cup of tea tree castile soap to 1 quart of warm water, and stir to mix. (If you don’t have tea tree soap on hand, you can also add 6-8 drops of melaleuca oil for the same effect.) Pour into a spray bottle, then spray wherever you’ve spotted ants hanging around. (But keep this spray away from plants, as this solution could burn them.)

Foaming Hand Wash

This homemade foaming hand soap gets an antibacterial boost from the addition of a few essential oils. Just stir together castile soap, a bit of coconut oil, and some essential oils, and pour it into a foaming soap bottle. My favorite thing about this soap is that it leaves your hands feeling clean without drying them out. Get the full recipe at the link below!

Related: How To Make A Natural Foaming Hand Soap That Won’t Dry Out Your Skin

Baby Wash

Castile soap is very gentle, which makes it a great choice for washing your baby! Add 1 ounce of castile soap to 2 ounces of purified or distilled water. Add 3-6 drops of lavender, lemon, or wild orange essential oils, if desired. Make sure to keep the soap mixture away from sensitive baby eyes!

“Soft Scrub” Cleaner

Use castile soap to make your own homemade “soft scrub” type cleaning solution. This cleaner also contains baking soda to help scrub away grime, and vinegar to dissolve tough messes. Get the full details on making this cleaner at the link below.

Related: How To Make An All-Natural “Soft Scrub” Cleanser

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Shaving “Cream”

Rub a little bit of castile soap between wet hands to create a luscious lather that’s perfect for shaving! The oils in the soap help the razor glide across your skin, reducing razor burn and nicks. Use it on your face, underarms, legs, or wherever!

Oil Soap Plant Spray

Insects, fungal infections, and other plant diseases can be a real problem for home gardeners. Use castile soap to make a homemade oil soap plant spray that acts as a natural insecticide and fungicide! My daughter uses this spray to keep powdery mildew at bay when it creeps into her garden late in the summer. Get the full recipe for my oil soap plant spray below.

Related: Make Your Own Organic Oil Soap Garden Spray

Hand-Washing Dishes

Castile soap can even help you wash your dishes! Fill your sink with 10 parts warm water and 1 part castile soap. Wash and rinse your dishes as usual. You can also use this ratio to make a soapy solution that’s perfect for those refillable dish scrubbing brushes.

Dog Shampoo

Castile soap makes a great dog shampoo! Just wet your dog’s coat and work a small amount of castile soap into it until you achieve a good lather. Continue shampooing, then rinse well. Your dog’s coat will look clean and shiny once it’s dry!

Window Cleaner

If your windows need a lot of help in the cleaning department, use castile soap to help power through the grime. Add 1 tablespoon of castile soap to 1 quart of water, then pour the mixture into a spray bottle. Spray it liberally onto your windows and use a sponge or scrubber to get through the grime. Follow with a rinse of club soda, or a mixture of 1 part water and 1 part vinegar.

Honey Facial Cleanser

Combine 3 tablespoons of honey, 1/2 cup of vegetable glycerin, and 2 tablespoons of castile soap. Pour the mixture into a small bottle, and use as a facial cleanser! The honey helps your skin retain moisture, and the soap helps clean your skin without drying it out.

Related: How To Make 4 All-Natural Facial Cleansers

Foot Scrub

Make a simple foot scrub by combining 1 cup of sugar, 1 tablespoon of castile soap, 2 tablespoons of coconut oil, and 4 drops of peppermint essential oil. (Or use peppermint castile soap and eliminate the essential oil.) Scrub away dry skin for softer feet!

Toilet Touch-Ups

Castile soap can help you keep your toilet looking clean(er) between bathroom cleanings. Just put a few drops of castile soap into your toilet, then give it a quick swish with your toilet brush, and flush.

Sinus Helper

Use a castile soap with essential oils to help clear sinus congestion. Fill a large bowl with hot water, and add a squeeze of peppermint or eucalyptus castile soap. Then lean over the bowl, and drape a towel over your head to trap the steam inside. Breathe deeply, and you’ll feel your airways and nasal passages start to open up!

Bedding Wash

Here’s a special wash technique that will help kill and eliminate dust mites from your bedding. Add 1/3 cup of castile soap to your washer along with the bedding. Pour 1/2 cup of vinegar into the fabric softener cup or dispenser, so it gets added during the rinse cycle. Then turn your washer on to the hottest water setting. Once the wash cycle is done, dry your bedding on the hottest dry cycle. (This is for a normal washer. If you have an HE washer, cut the amount of castile soap and vinegar in half.)

Makeup Remover

Make a simple makeup remover solution by mixing equal parts castile soap, witch hazel, and a carrier oil of your choice. Use with a soft cloth or cotton pad to gently remove eye makeup.

Floor Cleaner

Add 1/2 cup of castile soap to 3 gallons of hot water to make a simple mopping solution. Dip your mop into your bucket, and mop your way to clean, shiny floors!

Makeup Brush Cleaner

Squirt a small amount of castile soap into a small bowl, then fill with warm water. Swish your makeup brushes around in the soapy water, making sure to get the soapy solution well into the bristles. Rinse the brushes with cool water until the water runs clear, then allow the brushes to air dry.

Bonus Tip: Turn Bar Soap Into Liquid Soap

A lot of times a bar of castile soap can be quite a bit cheaper than the liquid kind. And you can turn a bar of castile soap into liquid soap really easily! Just chop up the bar of soap into tiny pieces, then place the soap pieces in a mason jar. Fill the mason jar with boiling water, and let it sit for about 20 minutes. Stir well to incorporate the dissolved soap into the water.

 

G2Voice Broadcast #81: NOT in the mouth, so NOT on the skin!

Tune in Sunday April 1st, 2018 at: 10 AM CST on:

www.g2voice.is

 

You can now donate at: www.g2churchbooks.org for the PRINTED book, “Imagine, A World Without DIS-EASE Is IT Possible?

This will help the Genesis II Church to do more worldwide! ALL donations for this VERY Informative Book go to the Genesis II Church of Health and Healing. Let’s get this book into tens of thousands of people around the world to open their eyes to the Truth about DIS-EASE!

 

 

Lifetime Membership in the Genesis II Church of Health and Healing!

 

Instead of renewing your G2 Church Membership yearly why not pay for a lifetime membership for a donation of 200 U.S. and be a G2 Church Member for LIFE!! For more information contact us at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

Let’s change the world together!

Archbishop Mark S. Grenon


 

MMS Saves Lives.

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MMS Testimonials:
Videos - MMS Testimonials on YouTube
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Jim Humble Interviews:
Jim Humble Talks to Freedom Central About MMS (YouTube)

Responses to MMS Critics:
Jim Humble Responds to Rita O'Reilly RTE Current Affairs TV in Dublin Ireland

Guides - Tutorials - Howtos:
How to make MMS: Sodium Chlorite 22.4% (YouTube)


Red Cross MMS Malaria cure cover-up scandal:

LEAKED: Proof Red Cross cured 154 Malaria cases with MMS: This video got leaked 1st of July 2013 and makes it impossible for the Red Cross to keep claiming that their Sodium chlorite 22.4% (MMS) study never took place, as was their response to the 2nd of may video.
youtube.com/watch?v=FrwZN1cPfX8

Red Cross cures 154 Malaria cases in Uganda with MMS:
This video was released 2nd of May 2013.
youtube.com/watch?v=5jY2yab0uLc

Read about the Red Cross MMS Malaria scandal on the MMS Wiki:
http://mmswiki.is/index.php/Red_Cross
http://mmswiki.is/index.php/Red_Cross_Malaria_Cover-up_-_Media_Coverage 
http://mmswiki.is/index.php/Red_Cross_Video_Transcript


Jim Humble and Tiger

This breakthrough can save your life, or the life of a loved one. In 1996, while on a gold mining expedition in South America, I discovered that chlorine dioxide quickly cured malaria. Since that time, it has proven to restore partial or full health to hundreds of thousands of people suffering from a wide range of disease, including cancer, diabetes, hepatitis A, B, C, Lyme disease, MRSA, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, HIV/AIDS, malaria, autism, infections of all kinds, arthritis, high cholesterol, acid reflux, kidney or liver diseases, aches and pains, allergies, urinary tract infections, digestive problems, high blood pressure, obesity, parasites, tumors and cysts, depression, sinus problems, eye disease, ear infections, dengue fever, skin problems, dental issues, problems with prostate (high PSA), erectile dysfunction and the list goes on. This is by far not a comprehensive list. I know it sounds too good to be true, but according to feedback I have received over the last 18 years, I think it’s safe to say MMS is able to overcome most diseases known to mankind.

Jim Humble's Books

 

mms health recovery guidebook w99

Go back up MMS Health Recovery Guidebook (2016)

Introducing the MMS Health Recovery Guidebook, including my new Health Recovery Plan (HRP), available for download. Discover the latest up-to-date information on my MMS technology, significant completely new data, and improvements that myself and others have determined through on-going use of MMS around the globe.

Over 50 updated tried and proven protocols are outlined, including some key tips and secrets for all those who wish to recover their health from most illness and disease and/or learn about prevention and longevity!

The health recovery procedures given in this book are the result of 20 years of teaching people how to use MMS. Scores of people worldwide have used and applied the principles outlined in my first books, or taught in seminars. As a result, over the years I have received a great deal of feedback, much of which has contributed to this book and to the development of my new Health Recovery Plan.

Unfortunately there is much misinformation floating around regarding MMS, and this too, has compelled me to write this book. I have written this guidebook to help you learn the fundamentals of the Master Mineral Solution (MMS) in a clear and concise manner. This book is chock full of a number of protocols that when followed properly, help restore people’s health. Our Key Protocols go together with a number of Supporting Protocols to make up the Health Recovery Plan. In this book you’ll learn about the overall sequence or strategy for this plan.

If you have a serious health issue of one kind or another from which you need to recover—this book is for you. Likewise, if your health seems to be “OK” but you would like to nevertheless achieve optimum health, this book is also for you. Whatever category you fit in—a basic ongoing routine with MMS can help you (and/or your loved ones and pets/animals) get healthy, keep you healthy, and help you maintain a good quality of life! The key is to use MMS properly—this book will show you how.

 

 
Download Full Ebook
 

Go back up The Master Mineral Solution of the 3rd Millennium (2011)

This is my second book on MMS. It includes more past history about the continuing story of MMS. You’ll learn about the basics of MMS, including the chemistry of it and how and why it works. Also included are instructions for several ways how you can make your own MMS.

The Master Mineral Solution of the Third Millennium is essential to those who want to learn the chemical and technical foundation of how MMS works. A chemical explanation for laymen and scientists alike is included. Learn about oxidizers, and how oxidation destroys pathogens. This is a must have reference book for those who want to delve deeper into understanding how MMS works. This book includes some of the basic original MMS protocols, however, if you are in need of health recovery today, I suggest you order my latest book, the MMS Health Recovery Guidebook for the updated protocols and information on overcoming most diseases of mankind.

If you are interested in the story of MMS there are three chapters in this book telling the continuing story of MMS in this world. Should you want the full story you will need to also buy my first book, The Miracle Mineral Solution of the 21st Century. It is estimated that 20,000,000 people had used MMS by the year 2008. Hundreds of thousands of lives have been saved and the suffering of thousands has been overcome.

 

Download Full Ebook
 

Go back up Secrets of Enlightenment (2012)

This book gives simple answers to most of the questions people ask, such as: Where did I come from? Why am I here? Why don’t I remember my existence before this life? What is my purpose in life? Etc.

This book has been 60 years in the writing and compilation (this lifetime). It is unique and quite different than most books about enlightenment.  I believe that you learn about spirituality and life by living life and taking part in the game of life, not by being tucked away in a cloistered setting. You may not believe in past lives, but in case you do, I believe I have received much of the information about life given in this book from past lives. This book gives simple answers to most of the questions people ask, such as: Where did I come from? Why am I here? Why don’t I remember my existence before this life? What is my purpose in life? Etc.

Secrets of Enlightenment points out that life is a game and that you should play it to the hilt. In these pages you’ll discover secrets, or what I call an understanding of life, that is not found in any other book on Earth and if that is not so, I will be happy to refund your money at any time.

 

Download Full Ebook
 

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